Can I Bring My Dog In My RV?

Nov 5 2015

It’s the American Dream, done the Good Life style.   A nice house, a white picket fence, a couple of kids, the family pet and one big, bad RV parked just a few feet away.  Sounds pretty darn good, right?  You bet it does! But, when it comes time to spin those RV’s wheels to a campground paradise, is it best to leave your pet at home, or should you bring Rover along with you in your RV?

For most pet owners, that furry friend is another member of the family.  And, since we’re animal lovers, too, the answer to us is pretty clear.  Yes, you should bring your pet camping in your RV. Here are some things that you might want to take into consideration, though, before you pack up your pet’s bowls and toys for their first RV retreat.

PLANNING

Choosing the right destination is, obviously, key when it comes to any RV vacation but even more so when you’re bringing your pet with you.  Most campgrounds do allow pets but there are some that restrict Fido from being a fellow camper, so you’ll want to make certain you’re aware of the restrictions your destination may have.  To make things easy, check out this site that boasts a huge list of pet-friendly RV resorts and campgrounds in the United States.  When you plan your trip, you might also want to pick out some spots for Spot’s needed ‘breaks.’

PACKING

Packing for your pet is crucial to make the most of your free time with Fluffy.  We suggest putting a list together before you pack so you can have as little worry as possible when you reach your destination.  Things to consider packing:

  • Health and vaccination records

  • Medications

  • ID tags (preferably on your pet in case they get separated.)

  • Leash (because most campgrounds require a leash)

  • Food, treats and water (for maintaining your pet’s normal schedule)

  • Favorite toys (are better for Chewy to chew on than the leg of your dining room table)

  • Crates, beds or blankets (for familiarity and comfort)

  • Pooper scooper/plastic bags (for being the best campsite neighbor you can be)

  • Cleaning supplies (for the accidents that might happen along the way)

PUTTING THE RV IN GEAR

Once you’ve planned and packed, it’s time to turn the keys to hit the open road.  Just as you would with any travelers with two legs, you’ll want to have your four-legged friends ride along with you in your truck.  Although there are no laws preventing your pet from riding in your trailer, for safety’s sake you’ll want them in your vehicle.  The best situation is having your cat or dog travel in a secured crate or with some sort of harness.  Keeping your pets fastened will also prevent them from jumping out of vehicles ahead of you when you take a break. Additionally, the crate could serve as a familiar place for your pooch to park when it’s rest time in the RV.

PARKED PAWS

Once you arrive at your final destination, and you pull into your site, take some time to explore your area with your pet.  Becoming familiar with the new surroundings will only help lessen any anxiety they may have about being in a new place.  It’s also a chance for your pawed pal to mark a little territory.  These scents will seriously aid with the anxiety just discussed.

Speaking of marking territory, no pet-friendly park will mind if they do.  All pet-friendly parks will have a problem, though, if you don’t pick up after your pet.  Take that pooper scooper and those plastic bags along with you on your walks.  You did pack them, after all.

If you do need to leave the RV for a period of time without your pet, make sure you leave them with some of their toys and things from home.  You’ll want them to be comfortable in your toy hauler, and you’ll want to provide them with distractions in case they get a case of the ‘chews’ like this guy.

Ultimately, your pet is a member of your family, so you know what makes them tick (along with other things.)  If you plan ahead and pack properly, Tommy and Tucker will be camping right alongside you.  Now, that sounds like the Good Life.