RV Recycling While Camping

Jan 11 2017

It’s a no brainer. Going camping and going green are two things that go together like chicken and biscuits, right? It’s actually kind of rare to find campsites that have recycling facilities on site. Just under 2,600 recycling sites are found in the US. That sounds like a lot, but when you stop and think about how big our country is, and that there are at least 13,000 campgrounds in the US and Canada, that number seems to get smaller and smaller.If you’re looking to do your part to reduce your footprint here on Mother Earth, here are some tips to help you recycle while you’re enjoying her beauty.

What’s recyclable?

Let’s be honest. It’s been awhile since you’ve really looked into what exactly is recyclable. It’s just really confusing with all the rules and regulations for what can and can’t be recycled. Why can’t it be a simple process?! We’ve got the skinny to help you decide where it should go.

According to Waste Management, any type of aluminum (like cans or disposable bakeware) or steel is a recyclable material and should go in your recycling container. Almost all types of paper, cardboard and paperboard are also accepted. So those paper milk containers you’ve been throwing away? Add them to your recycling container the next time around.

It was long-believed that the number on your plastic items was the way you knew whether or not you could recycle it. Our opinion? It was probably someone as ornery as your Uncle Phil who started the rumors. But no more! The general rule is that if your plastic is shaped like a bottle, jar or jug, it’s probably safe to recycle (as long as it’s clean!).

Some people don’t know that most batteries, light bulbs and electronics can also be recycled. These materials can contain chemicals that are harmful to the environment, so there are special rules that surround the recycling process for these. They should never be thrown in with regular trash! Make sure to check in with your recycling facility to get the facts before you have it hauled off.

Glass. This is one of those particularly confusing recyclables that has a lot of rules and leaves people unsure of whether or not they should toss it in the trash or recycling container. According to Waste Management’s website: clear, amber and emerald glass can generally be recycled. Ceramics, dishes, windows and mirrors, and a few other exceptions can’t be recycled. Check out the full list on their website if you’re still left wondering.

Know where to find recycling.

It can be tough to know where to find a place to recycle the items you’ve separated. If you’ve taken the time to make sure everything is clean and organized you want that “feel good” of dropping things off to finish the job. Checking ahead of time to see which campgrounds offer recycling services is an easy way to prevent having to store and haul your recyclables all over. We found PitchUp, which is a website made to give campers information on surrounding campsites, but it’s also go a feature built into it to show you which of these sites offer recycling.

Find a great recycling bin.

Receptacles like these don’t take up much room and easily contain either trash or recyclables that can be disposed of later. Pop them out when you need them, empty and zip to close. If you’re looking to get really fancy, this is a similar design, but is the iconic green with the recycling symbol. The manufacturers even added a divider so you can separate returnable cans from the rest of your recycling material.

Taking the time to recycle waste may not seem like much, and it’s an easy thing to do, but it has a big impact on the earth on a larger scale. If everyone took the time to make these simple efforts we could significantly reduce pollution, energy consumption and the amount of trash in our landfills. Not to mention the direct impact on wildlife and the environment we enjoy when we’re exploring in our rigs. Recycle your trash and see how easy (with a little planning) it is to live a clean, respectful Good Life.